MENU
Filed under Identity

JAMAF: Highlights of the Festival

Zack Davisson: Manga Translator at this weekend's Japanese festival and Heather Uhl's Perspective

  Zack Davisson’s comic, “Narrow Road”. This is a collaboration between Mark Morse, an artist, and Davisson. According to www.thegatelessgate.com, “Their goal is to blend these traditions of philosophy, folklore, and storytelling into an exciting journey of two friends.”

Photo Provided

Zack Davisson’s comic, “Narrow Road”. This is a collaboration between Mark Morse, an artist, and Davisson. According to www.thegatelessgate.com, “Their goal is to blend these traditions of philosophy, folklore, and storytelling into an exciting journey of two friends.”

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






EvCC students took advantage of a  tour of the Nishiyama garden, Japanese tea tastings, a cosplay parade and more at this past weekend’s Japanese Anime and Manga Arts Festival.

The festival was in the Jackson Center, Gray Wolf Hall and the Nippon Business Institute which is located near Wetmore Ave.

From 2:00-3:30 p.m. on Friday, Zack Davisson hosted a Manga Translation 101 – Lecture. Davisson has written “Yurei: The Japanese Ghost” and a comic called “Narrow Road”.

Davisson says “I’ve been translating manga for some years now, including the award-winning ‘Showa: A History of Japan’ and the famous folklore comic ‘Kitaro’.”

Zack Davisson says he got serious about translating manga when he visited Japan. “In Japan I also discovered all of these great artists who weren’t translated because they didn’t fit the American image of anime/manga.” So he made it his goal to bring these artists to English culture.

When asked what inspires him to come to JAMAF this year at EvCC, he says “The enthusiasm of everyone involved. Meeting Heather Uhl, Mayumi Smith, Keith Takechi, and all of the student volunteers was inspiring.”

On Friday from 4:00 – 5:00 p.m. the Japanese Club advisor Heather Uhl investigated folklore themes from the film “Spirited Away”. Uhl says students attend JAMAF so they can “experience global perspectives through an ancient art form that touches all aspects of Japanese culture.”

EvCC’s Japanese Club has risen as leaders and advocates over the years and this is impressive to Uhl. She says that a lot of the club members have social anxieties and so “The fact that they would work through these barriers shows their passion as student leaders and their commitment to Japanese Club’s mission: to promote international good.”

The Japanese Club’s mission shined at the festival. Uhl says they offered this “so (people) could experience global perspectives through an ancient art form that touches all aspects of Japanese culture.”

Print Friendly

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • JAMAF: Highlights of the Festival

    Identity

    Appreciate Don’t Appropriate

  • JAMAF: Highlights of the Festival

    Identity

    Worldwide Wholesome Soul Foods

  • JAMAF: Highlights of the Festival

    Identity

    EvCC International Club

  • JAMAF: Highlights of the Festival

    Identity

    There is More to Winter than Christmas

  • JAMAF: Highlights of the Festival

    Identity

    War on Poverty

  • JAMAF: Highlights of the Festival

    Identity

    Finding the Help you Need

  • JAMAF: Highlights of the Festival

    Identity

    Large Crowds of EvCC Students Attend Trump Rally in Lynden

  • JAMAF: Highlights of the Festival

    Identity

    Burning Bras Done Right

  • Identity

    Cinco de Mayo, Not Drinko de Mayo

  • Identity

    Students of Color Conference

The student news site of Everett Community College in Everett, Washington
JAMAF: Highlights of the Festival